Y is for (time of) Year


YThis is a post in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge: http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/

How many people could survive a zombie apocalypse depends a lot on the time of year, and how the seasons affect different places on Earth. Why? Because humans will very quickly have to get over relying on grocery stores for their food supply, as they will be looted clean in the first two weeks. They will have to learn gardening and crop farming, livestock care, hunting and gathering, and these may take a while— I’ve lived in the country for about 26 years and I only learned how to garden recently, after I read the Square Foot Gardening book. http://www.amazon.com/Square-Foot-Gardening-Second-Revolutionary/dp/1591865484  [Zombie prepper hint: stockpile a bunch of copies of Square Foot Gardening, as well as Belanger’s small livestock book and books on edible wild plants by Euell Gibbons. These will become valuable trade goods once the apocalypse hits.]

Where I currently live, in the southern part of Upper Michigan, is a better place as regards water supply. In my own rural home, I have a well If that fails, I have a cedar swamp. I can dig down there and get water from seep holes.

Survival here would be tough if the apocalypse hit in fall. There would be some hunting opportunities— official deer hunting season is in November. But folks around here store their venison in chest or upright freezers. If we lost our electricity, those freezers would be useless. Hardcore preppers who have the cash might get solar or wind gennies that could handle a freezer and a few other items, but the rest of us would have to master alternative ways of preserving our deer harvest. Fall is also a good time to gather mushrooms and some other wild edible plants, and I suppose one might grow a few garden crops like radishes that have really short growing seasons.

A Winter apocalypse would be hell on survivors. Snow would limit movement and there would be little to forage. But the snow would inhibit zombie movement even more. If your home had a wood stove or furnace, you could survive. You could also sprout alfalfa and bean sprouts if you had sprouters and a supply of mung bean and alfalfa sprouting seeds. The snow and ice would help you preserve your meat supply.

Spring is probably the best time for a zombie apocalypse to hit around here. The stores would be full of gardening supplies and seeds. There would be time to establish a garden. You might be able to score some chickens from panicking neighbors— in these days, even well-to-do folks in cities are keeping small flocks of chickens. And out in the country, chicken keepers may hatch out eggs for their less fortunate neighbors. [Prepper hint: a woman can hatch out two or three fertile chicken eggs in her bra, using body heat. A guy could probably do the same if he had a bra in his size available. It would be annoying, wearing a bra full of eggs 24-7 for the 21 days until hatch, but it can be done.]

Summer is also a decent time for survival. You can still have a garden, you can possibly get a goat or a dairy cow from an abandoned farm, and you’d have time to hand-harvest enough grass for hay in order to keep the critter alive.

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5 thoughts on “Y is for (time of) Year

  1. I read this with great interest. I never really thought about gardening before. I kinda assumed we’d be mobile enough (and part of the very few survivors) to go and scrounge from stores and homes for years. I can barely make it home from the grocery without breaking eggs, no way for those things to hatch in my bra! lol

  2. Lexa Cain, I can’t handle grocery store eggs without breaking, either. They are thin-shelled. What you need for bra-chickens is fertile farm eggs, never refrigerated.

  3. My two boys have made careful thoughts about this, and I’m happy to admit that we’re ready! Lol! Living on a farm might be helpful in that sense 😉

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