Celebrate: Star Trek anniversary


Celebrate blog hop

It’s the 50th anniversary of Star Trek this year, and I’m celebrating. Since I was 8 years old when the original Star Trek premiered, you can do the math and find out how older-than-dirt I really am.

Why did the original Star Trek work so much better than its television successors or the movies? In large part because the original Star Trek was written for a mass audience. Not only that, a mass audience of the 1960s, when Western television shows that didn’t violate Judeo-Christian values were the most popular form of entertainment, and the three networks had strict rules to keep swearing and sex out of the public’s living rooms.

One thing that made the original Star Trek beloved is that the Enterprise was a military space ship— you can tell by the military ranks and command structure, and the fact that the ship had state-of-the-art weapons and defenses. Military was something that a lot of men in the audience could relate to in 1966. Some had served in World War 2, and others in the Korean War, and military service was something people did proudly. It was not until a bit later that the anti-Vietnam-War movement convinced large segments of the people that military veterans were people to be spat upon.

The original Star Trek gave us an optimistic vision of our future. Perhaps the most optimistic, for me, is the sheer number of times the King James Version of the Bible was quoted by a Star Trek character. Probably unintentionally, Gene Roddenberry let me know there was a place in his future vision for a Christian like me.

Contrast that to the most popular vision of the future we have on the small screen today: The Walking Dead. The message seems to be that if you are one of the lucky few to not become a zombie, you can have a good time killing zombies for a while. Then Negan will beat you to death with his pet ball bat, Lucille. Not my favorite view of the future (though I’m a zombie prepper anyway.)


My own private Star Trek universe:

I’ve been making up stories in my head about starships and the Enterprise crew since about 1966. Still do, some of the time. By the time I was a teen I began to realize that my versions of the Enterprise crew were beginning to drift away from the original concepts.

By the time I became a Serious Writer, I began to think of making a Star Trek universe of my own with characters who belonged to me. In the past couple of years I’ve been working harder on it, and have come up with the Starship Destine universe.

The Starship Destine is at the center of the universe’s stories, so far. It is a massive spherical ship that only rarely lands on a planet. At the core of the ship is a forest— transplanted tree by tree, plant by plant from a forest plot owned by an Amish farm family and sold to the Fleet.

The starships of the Destine’s time are not the massive government funded exploration ships of the Star Trek universe. A major role of the starships is to facilitate interplanetary trade, and to engage in trade themselves to pay the bills.

The starship Destine is a new starship, which was landed on the planet Sackett on the grounds of the Fleet Academy. During an attack on the planet Sackett by unknown forces, cadets and instructors from the Academy and neighboring Amish farmers took refuge on the ship. One almost-graduated cadet, deemed captain of the ship for the purpose of a training exercise, became captain for real when the Destine escaped the attack on Sackett and began a search for surviving Fleet authority figures….


This is a post in the Celebrate the Small Things blog hop. It is a Friday event which gives bloggers a chance to interact with other bloggers and build up a bigger readership. To sign up yourself, go to: http://lexacain.blogspot.com/2015/01/celebrate-small-things.html

 

The first book I ever bought for myself.

The first book I ever bought for myself.

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5 thoughts on “Celebrate: Star Trek anniversary

  1. I am a fan of The Walking Dead, but you are right. It is so bleak. I wonder how much longer the series can keep fans attention.

    I like the idea of trees inside a space ship. The way things are going on our planet, we may need to preserve nature somewhere safe.

    Our family never watched Star Trek, but I’m not sure why. I can remember wasting hours on The A Team, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, and The Dukes Of Hazzard. What were we thinking?

  2. The original Star Trek will always be my favorite. I’ve never found the other incarnations to be very interesting. I just couldn’t get into the characters.
    I hope you keep going with your Starship Destine idea. It sounds like the beginnings of a great story.

  3. I was a Star Trek fan as long as I can remember (even as a little kid). The original remains my favorite, although I didn’t mind the Next Generation. The others left me flat. Your Starship Destine sounds interesting, so don’t give up on that one.

  4. I’m very close to your age and remember Star Trek well. I completely agree with you about the vision of the future it presented: one that was moral, ethical, fair, and inclusive. I had a few ST books but mostly about how they made the show and about my favorite episode (then) “The Trouble with Tribbles.” I never really liked the old westerns or TWD that’s so popular now. I loved mystery shows like Quincy, McMillan and Wife, Magnum, and the Rockford Files. Ahh, the good old days. I miss them…

  5. I can visualise that spaceship with a forest on . . . what a great idea. Quite often I find the originals are the best, maybe it’s because they are what you first fall for!

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