What true crime stories can teach us about fictional characters

I like to read true crime books, if they are well-written or if the case is interesting to me. And one thing I’ve learned about true crime stories— it’s all about the characters. There are some true crime books published every year because the murder cases garnered a few headlines and people want to read more. But the books soon drop out of sight, because most people don’t find the cases all that interesting.

Other cases— like those of Jack the Ripper, Lizzie Borden, Albert Fish, Ed Gein, and O.J. Simpson— remain of interest, no matter how much time goes by. Why is this? The difference is about the characters.

Some murders are almost routine. Armed robber kills victim. Pimp kills prostitute. Violent husband kills wife. Wife poisons husband— or a series of them— for the insurance money. These cases make headlines at the time, but most of them are quickly forgotten once the trial is over.

But the interesting cases are those with something special. A murderer that is notable and interesting— like O. J. Simpson, once the nation’s hero during his football career. Or perhaps an accused murderer that many believe is innocent, like Lizzie Borden. Or a sympathetic victim, like little Grace Budd who was lured away by Albert Fish and cruelly murdered.

Murderers aren’t normally the kind of people we want to spend time with, but the good true crime author presents the case as if it were a fictional tale with heroes and villains, and an ending that often brings a degree of closure.

Fictional stories are like that. It’s all about the characters. If the characters are dull and prosaic and walking stereotypes, the book is dull and you may not be able to finish it.

I knew an author that had a longish book out on Kindle. I read a lot of the beginning but I couldn’t find characters I much cared about or plotlines where I just had to know the outcome— perhaps because they involved characters that hadn’t caught my interest. But then the author wrote a novella about one of his more minor characters. He did a great job on the novella and on the Lead character. It still didn’t give me the inspiration to finish the longer book, though I did try. But my experience makes the point— the characters are the thing.

Many writers, like those with Asperger Syndrome or autism, lack the social skills and insight to learn enough about the real people around them to create book characters based on these real people’s traits. But reading books, both fiction books and nonfiction like true crime, allow you to benefit from some other person’s social insights. Of course, a true crime writer might be inaccurate about the details of some of the characters. Some writers repeat local gossip about a murderer to blacken that murderer’s name. I read a book about a woman who killed all of her own children, perhaps because of the mental disorder Munchhausen Syndrome by Proxy. The local gossips accused the woman of being part of a rumored witchcraft coven in the area. But the evidence seems to point to the idea that this woman was quite conventional and attended Christian churches.

Now, fictional characters are not exactly like real people. Each fictional character has a function in the overall plot of the story. Real life isn’t that neat. But learning more about real people, even through a habit of true crime fandom, can help you create more compelling fictional people.

The facts about ‘Satanic ritual killings’ #spiritualwarfare

Recently I bought and read a book called ‘Law & Disorder: Inside the Dark Heart of Murder’ by John Douglas, a pioneering FBI profiler. In one of the cases he covered in the book, he touched on the one-time hysteria over the concept of Satanism and Satanic murders.

At the height of the craze, Satanic ‘experts’, often Evangelical pastors or laymen, claimed that there were fifty thousand child abductions a year, mostly, it was implied, due to Satanists and their blood lust. Douglas said the statistic was about right, but the majority of those cases were kidnappings by a non-custodial parent.

Satanic ‘experts’ kept the fear up by making lists of Satanic symbols, many of which had other purposes, confusing Satanism with Wicca and Neopaganism, and declaring that young persons who were fans of Heavy Metal music, or who played games such as Dungeons & Dragons, were probably doing so because such things were ‘Satanic.’

The reality, as John Douglas’s FBI statistics show, is there was NOT ONE case in which one or more persons in a Satanic group or coven conspired to commit a murder. There were individual killers, such as the Night Stalker, who claimed to be inspired by Satan or who had Satanic-seeming tattoos, or who said that the Devil caused them to commit the crime in question. But these loners were nothing like what the Satanic hysteria claimed was happening.

The problem is that many Christians, particularly Evangelical ones, read books or heard sermons that made them believe in the Satanic ritual killings theory. Some took ‘facts’ from this and put them into spiritual warfare stories. Others to this day believe it because a sweet old pastor told them it was true back in the day, and their sweet old pastor, now gone to his reward, would not have lied to them.

But sweet old pastors and devout Christian mentors can be mistaken. If the pastor heard false information from a Christian source they felt was trustworthy, they may have passed it on thinking it was fact. In the same way, a sweet old lady teacher I had in a Christian school once told me that God refuses to listen to the prayers of Catholics because Catholicism was so ‘unchristian.’ While I am convinced that this lady would not have lied to me, I now believe her belief was wrong, that God would not have allowed Christianity to vanish from the Earth from the Early Church days until the ‘Reformation’, and that God listens to all prayers, even those from persons who have very little knowledge of religious truth.

Now, I know Spiritual Warfare novels are popular among some Christians. But the facts are important. While I was a Neopagan and rejecting Christianity, I read a book by Frank Peretti which seemed to me to be demonizing Neopagans and was very ill-informed. This book pushed me even further away from Christianity by these errors. Not, I expect, the effect the writer was going for.