Intermittent Fasters must be prepared

If you decide to try intermittent fasting— fasting for less than a day— you have to be prepared. You have to be prepared with correct information about fasting— as in reading a good book about fasting such as The Complete Guide to Fasting by Dr. Jason Fung and Jimmy Moore. You also need to be prepared in other ways. You need the right foods for fasting— both in the few things you are allowed to consume while fasting, and the foods you need for good ketogenic diet meals afterwards.

You may feel, after reading the fasting book by Dr. Fung, that you can do it with fasting alone, eating carb-containing meals during your eating times. After all, he got started in recommending fasting because some of his patients were not following the rules for a ketogenic diet— they would give up bread but not flatbread or noodles.

This is the big temptation of the Intermittent Fasting lifestyle— you get through your fasting time— perhaps you get ready to break your fast at 2pm instead of noon. And then you get tempted. You’ve eaten nothing for a lot of hours— and so don’t you deserve a donut? A candy bar? A slice of pizza? And actually when you do IF, you can get away with it sometimes. I’ve had a carby meal on days when I only ate one meal, and the next morning had an OK blood sugar. And then I did the same thing the next day, and ate more carbs because I was so hungry, and had bad blood sugar the next morning.

IF and a ketogenic diet go together. If you are on a ketogenic diet, you are less hungry because you don’t have carbs shooting up your blood sugar and making you hungry for more carbs. Very often when I was doing the Atkins diet, I’d skip a meal because I just wasn’t hungry. This is how some people get into IF. They start skipping breakfast because they are unhungry on their ketogenic diet, they learn about IF and they just formalize their meal-skipping into intermittent fasting.

Fasting does not have to be water alone. You can drink unsweetened coffee or tea. You can also have some broth. When you are feeling bad on a fast— or even on starting a ketogenic diet like Atkins induction— drinking a cup of broth can help. Part of that is the salt in most broths. If you make your own bone broth, be sure to add an appropriate amount of salt. I add 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon to a cup of bone broth.

Dr. Fung, in the fasting book, allows you to put a small amount of cream or oil in your coffee or tea. Kind of like bulletproof coffee, but with smaller amounts. You are allowed this once in every fasting day. This makes it less than a total fast, but some people really need this mini-bulletproof coffee or tea in order to make it through fasting, at least the first few times. It means you have to have coffee, tea and cream and/or oil in the house if you are starting a fast, also broth— either homemade bone broth, or the less-ideal commercial bouillon cubes or powder.

You also need to have the right foods in your house for a ketogenic friendly meal. I am in less than ideal health, and find that sometimes I just don’t have enough energy when the time comes to break the fast to cook a full ketogenic meal. I need to have some things that are easy to prepare or can be made ahead of time.

Right now, I’m making a lot of the chocolate milk recipe from Dana Carpender’s Fat Fast Cookbook (page 76). The original recipe calls for using canned full-fat coconut milk. I usually sub a little heavy whipping cream for some of the coconut milk, since I do eat dairy. But last time I used coconut milk alone and it was still good enough.

I also like to have cold cuts and cheese slices (not the wrapped-in-plastic American cheese) so I can make roll-ups— an easy low-carb answer to sandwiches. I always have cans of tuna in the house. I get the kind with olive oil as that is healthier.

My hope is to be well enough prepared to be able to eat ketogenic even when I’m tired or don’t feel like a lot of cooking. Last year I was sick for over a month and didn’t have any appetite— which was good because I couldn’t get out to the stores regularly and I couldn’t get people to drive me very often. I lost a lot of weight, but when my appetite started coming back I started buying bread and making myself sandwiches— which was a hard habit to kick.


My current fasting experience:

I’m trying to do Intermittent Fasting daily until at least 11am. I need to work more on quitting eating at a regular hour— I currently stop eating some time between 5pm and 8pm. Later eating gives me bad morning blood sugar. I tried a 24 hour fast one day when I had bad morning blood sugar. I went 26 hours, felt OK, and my blood sugar went down to a much more normal level. (I might point out that I am no longer on any blood sugar medications, which is why I don’t mention doctor visits before the fast to adjust meds.)

 

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Keto Living: Dana Carpender’s new Fat Fast Cookbook

Dana Carpender the Low-Carb/Keto cookbook author had come out with her second Fat Fast cookbook and so of course I ordered a copy. I loved her other Fat Fast cookbook.

What is a fat fast? It’s not a real fast as taught by Jimmy Moore and Dr. Jason Fung in the Complete Guide to Fasting. Fat fasting is a temporary restricted diet designed by Dr. Robert Atkins, author of The Atkins Diet Revolution. The Fat Fast was designed for patients who were already on Atkins’ diet at the strict Induction level and who had stopped losing weight when they still had weight to lose. The Fat Fast was, like the Atkins diet itself, based on scientific research. It is a restricted calorie diet, unlike most low carb dieting, and featured food rich in (healthy) fats. It has been shown that people lose more weight eating more fat than eating carbs or protein.

Under Atkins there were about 3 or 4 food items you could eat on a fat fast, but when Dana Carpender tried the fat fast she started created recipes that fit the nutritional profile of fat fast foods.

In this new cookbook there are many new recipes. One problem I have with this book is many recipes have as a main ingredient Shirataki noodles. These noodles are a great low carb noodle substitute but they taste weird compared to real, carb-filled noodles. Also, they are hard to get. My local grocery doesn’t carry them so I have to go into town to get them. They also are hard to store. They can’t be frozen but must be refrigerated. In my fridge it is cold enough on the shelf I stored Shirataki on that a package was frozen and destroyed.

But on the good side there were other recipes that I do want to try. There is a recipe for low-carb chocolate milk based on full-fat coconut milk. I haven’t tried the coconut milk version but have tried one in which I replaced the coconut milk with heavy whipping cream.

There is also a recipe for Vichyssoise which uses cauliflower instead of potato. I’m going to try that recipe as soon as I can get to a grocery store that sells leeks— recipe also calls for one leek.

Now, I myself am not really planning to do a lot of fat fasting anytime soon. I do daily intermittent fasting in the overnight to morning period. But the fat fast recipes can also be a part of any LCHF ketogenic diet, which is what I eat (or should be eating) during my eating hours.

I think the best way to stick to a ketogenic diet is to have a lot of recipe books for ketogenic diets on hand. You don’t need to do lots of exotic recipes every day. Just find a few recipes you really like, and make them regularly. I personally stockpile ingredients for some of my favorite recipes so I can make them without a special trip to the store. This is important during the winter where I live, since during snowstorms we can’t always make trips to the store.


Saturday is the day of the week I cover healthy/ketogenic diet issues as well as intermittent fasting. Usually. If you want to know more about ketogenic diet and fasting, I recommend the podcasts of Jimmy Moore. He often has Doctors on his podcasts, and discusses the scientific research that backs up approaches like ketogenic diets or fasting. I listen to his podcasts on most days, it helps me keep on track.

Jimmy Moore’s Fasting Talk Podcast.

Jimmy Moore’s Other Podcasts.

Make a low-carb/ketogenic bread substitute

For the person on a ketogenic/low-carb diet, there are two kinds of substitutes for bread: the products that CLAIM to be low-carb but have grain/gluten ingredients and are only slightly better than regular bread, and the kind you can eat freely on a ketogenic diet and aren’t very bread-like.

The reason we don’t like REAL ketogenic bread is that we are addicted to the carb fix we get from bread. No carbs, no grains, no fix. It’s like asking a heroin addict to be content with a vitamin B-12 injection.

OK. Real ketogenic bread. The classic recipe was called Diet Revolution Rolls (and Diet Revolution Bread) in Dr. Atkins first book, Dr. Atkins Diet Revolution. Google the recipe name and you can find the recipe, even a YouTube video that shows how to make it.

Diet Revolution Rolls require separation eggs and whipping up the egg whites. I know how to do this but I dislike it. It’s a chore, and if you get one little speck of egg yolk in your whites they won’t whip up.

So I came up with a new recipe. I call it ‘Dutch Baby Rolls’ since I adapted it from a recipe that uses Dutch Baby (a kind of big pancake) as a pizza crust. I just made it in my Yorkshire Pudding Pan in four servings and it came out very well. I have a small Yorkshire Pudding Pan — well, three of them— that I bought for making Diet Revolution Rolls in a variant sometimes called ‘Cloud Bread.’

So: you will need to get yourself a Yorkshire Pudding Pan to make this recipe. You might also try searching under Muffin Top Pan. Choose between pans on the size of the holes, and the depth of the holes. My pans have a depth of 1/2 inch, but I saw one with a 1 inch depth and am buying that. I use a 4 hole size since I bake in a small convection oven with the convection feature turned off.

The rolls in a batch of Dutch Baby Rolls will poof up and be high enough that you can slice each roll in half to use in making a sandwich. NOTE: if you whip up your batter and let it sit a long time, it won’t poof. If you accidentally set your oven for 325 and not 425, they will not poof. We like poof! Get it right.

The recipe is cut down from the Dutch Baby Pizza recipe on page 270 of Jimmy Moore and Maria Emmerich’s book ‘The Ketogenic Cookbook.’ Buy the book! (NOT an affiliate link.)

Dutch Baby Rolls

2 large eggs

1/2 cup heavy whipping cream

2 Tablespoon unflavored egg white or whey protein powder

1/4 teaspoon sea salt or Herbamare (salt flavored with veggies)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 F.
  2. Spray olive oil based pan spray on your Yorkshire pudding pan.
  3. Combine eggs, cream, protein powder and salt in bowl. Mix with electric mixer 1 minute.
  4. Pour batter into Yorkshire pudding pan. Fill holes not quite full. You don’t want a spill.
  5. Bake for about 15-16 minutes

Variations: you can substitute unsweetened almond milk or unsweetened coconut milk for the cream if you can’t handle dairy. Also, you can sprinkle a few poppy seeds or sesame seeds on the top of each roll before baking.

Reheating instructions:
I store my rolls in the fridge, by the way.
Cut roll in half. Place cut side up on a cookie sheet. Preheat your oven to 325 F. Not 425 like above. Place a small pat butter on each half on the cut side. Bake 4-6 minutes. You don’t want to burn them.

Variation: Place bacon bits and a slice of your favorite cheese on the ‘bottom’ half of your Dutch Baby Roll. In 4-6 minutes at 325 F, your cheese should become melty. Easy substitute for grilled cheese!

Taste: I used to make a cream puff recipe which called for lots of flour. I ate them like they were rolls. I think Dutch Baby Rolls taste a little like that. They are great for days when all I want to eat is a sandwich or hamburger-with-bun.

A time for feasting, a time for fasting

Fasting

In ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’, the authors talk about the importance of feasting and fasting. In most traditional cultures there are both feasts and fasts. They balance each other out. But in our culture the fasting side is ignored and we feast, feast, feast. And then we get Type 2 diabetes and die. Or, if we are lucky, we learn about ketogenic diets and Intermittent Fasting and live.

The authors of ‘The  Complete Guide to Fasting’ recommend a ketogenic diet for your eating periods. A ketogenic diet has been scientifically proven to have a number of health benefits— unlike the low-calorie/low-fat fad diet which has been shown in scientific studies to slow your metabolism and raise your blood sugar.

One thing you need for your ketogenic diet is some good recipes so you can make some food that is permitted on your diet and tasty. The hardest part of ketogenic is that most of us have to start cooking our own meals. Dr. Atkins in his diet books claimed that you could order what you want at restaurants. We don’t have that kind of restaurant where I live. The restaurants I used to go to had amazing levels of trouble just remembering not to bring me toast or muffins when I asked them not to.

What I most need is recipes I can make again and again. I used to always make up a batch of devilled eggs for ketogenic meals. I made some with cheese and bacon bits added to the yolk mixture.

Then I used to make a recipe with tuna adapted from a recipe in one of Dr. Atkins’ recipe books, for ‘fish loaf’. I’ve adapted a lot over the years and now add in a bit of mushrooms and a small amount of peas. That makes the ‘tuna loaf’ taste a bit like my mom’s tuna casserole.

I have a few other recipes that are my staples. But it is hard to make my own keto meals nearly every day when I’m not fasting. I’ve always been planning to try freezing portions of some recipes to reheat on days when I can’t stand cooking but I haven’t gotten to doing that yet. I’m not one of those super-organized kitchen women.

Lately what I have been making often is crustless quiche. I’ve made several variations— one with bacon bits, one with mushrooms, and one with some shredded Gouda cheese for the cheese portion and some tuna.

Intermittent Fasting really helps because it cuts down on the number of meals I have to cook. Frankly, I’d rather make some hot tea in the morning than cook something and have to clean up after myself.

Intermittent Fasting: You are already doing it…..

Podcaster Jimmy Moore sometimes says that talking about fasting is like using another f-word in church. Not very popular. But the fact is that Intermittent Fasting— fasting for less than a day— shouldn’t be so scary. We all do it.

Let’s think of someone with the worst eating habits ever. This person snacks during most of their waking hours. But this person takes a break from eating every night during sleep. So– let’s say this person snacks from dinner until midnight and goes to bed. Wakes up just before 6, and by the stroke of 6 has breakfast-food in the mouth. Bad, huh? But that person has just done intermittent fasting from midnight to 6. A six-hour fast!

Yesterday on Jimmy Moore’s Fasting podcast he had a guest, Aarn Farmer,  who does intermittent fasting daily for a few more hours than six a day. And he has gone from over 400 lbs to about half that. (Jimmy Moore also used to weigh over 400.)

In my own practice I am going back on to an intermittent fasting routine. My problem is that when I do eat, I eat high-carb foods too often. Jimmy Moore recommends going on a good ketogenic, low-carb diet before adding fasting to your routine. A ketogenic diet makes you less hungry and many people find themselves skipping meals when they have been on lowcarb/ketogenic diets for a while. (Unfamiliar with Low-Carb/Ketogenic diets? Read the book Keto Clarity by Jimmy Moore and  Eric Westman, MD.)

Intermittent fasting is about increasing your non-eating hours. Many people on an Intermittent Fasting plan skip breakfast. Biologically, breakfast-time is our least-hungry time of day.

You can also increase your non-eating hours by stopping eating after supper— cutting out those post-supper snacks. By stopping eating at 6pm after dinner, and not starting eating again until the next day’s lunch, you cut a number of eating hours out of the day.

There are a lot of health benefits from fasting, including intermittent fasting. The details of some of these benefits can be found in the book The Complete Guide to Fasting by Jimmy Moore and Dr. Jason Fung. You will learn, for example, that you can have cups of unsweetened coffee or tea while fasting, or even cups of bone broth.

Aarn Farmer, Jimmy Moore’s podcast guest, recommends listening to a lot of podcasts about intermittent fasting or about the ketogenic diet to keep you inspired. I’ve been doing that myself. I listen to Jimmy Moore’s Fasting podcast— new episodes come out on Fridays— on days when I’m doing intermittent fasting and his other health and diet podcasts on other days.  Jimmy Moore’s podcasts are great because he often has medical doctors as guests or co-podcasters, and he frequently talks about medical research of interest to those who fast or follow ketogenic diets.

I must admit I am not that good at fasting yet. I often don’t fast for as many hours in a day as I had planned— I usually eat lunch around 11 or 12, and I have a hard time with not snacking after supper. I also haven’t finished any longer fasts yet. But I am hopeful I will improve. The amount of intermittent fasting I’m doing at the moment is helping to bring my blood sugar down. Not into the normal range yet, but it’s better than it was.

 

 

Intermittent #Fasting, Day Two

Last night I finally bought book The Complete Guide to Fasting by Dr. Jason Fung and Jimmy Moore. I’ve been listening to Jimmy Moore’s health podcasts for some time now and he has a new podcast about fasting with his co-author, Dr. Fung.

What most people don’t know about fasting is that fasting isn’t some odd or scary thing. We do it every day when we stop eating in the evening, go to bed, and don’t eat again until morning. One form of fasting recommended in the book is the 16 hour fast, when you stop eating at dinner and don’t eat again until the next day at noon. Since human beings feel the least amount of hunger during the morning, the 16 hour fast is something many of us have done without knowing we are fasting!

I’ve actually been doing 16 hour fasts for years without thinking of it as fasting, ever since I read a health-related book which recommended skipping breakfast. In our snack-happy culture, we all need to start putting some limits on how many hours a day we are eating. (In 1970 the average person ate— meals and snacks— three times a day. Now we eat 6-7 times a day— and the diabetes and obesity rates are sky high.)

One thing that interests me about the book is that one author, Dr. Jason Fung, is a nephrologist (kidney doctor) who works with many diabetic patients. I have diabetes and kidney disease myself, and have endured a series of second-rate nephrologists who seem oriented to watching my kidneys deteriorate until I’m condemned to their dialysis clinic.

Dr. Fung seems to be giving his patients hope that their diabetes and kidney disease will get better when they follow his treatment which includes ketogenic diet and fasting. One of my nephrologists, by contrast, told me kidney disease never improves (even though mine had) and is never affected by diet changes.

Dr. Fung recommend his patients go on 3 fasts of 36 hours per week. How that works is:

Day one: stop eating after dinner

Day two: eat nothing all day, water and plain coffee and tea are allowed.

Day three: don’t eat until noon/lunch, stop eating after dinner

Day four: eat nothing all day

Day five: Don’t eat until noon/lunch, stop eating after dinner

Day six: eat nothing all day

Day seven: Don’t eat until noon/lunch.

You will notice that since day seven is followed by the next week’s day one, and so there are two eating days in a row.

DISCLAIMER: Nothing in this blog is to be construed as medical advise, and you should READ THE BOOK and pay attention to its restrictions and advice— including the advice to NOT FAST if you have certain medical conditions and CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR about your fasting.

I’m currently on Day Two of the plan about and have not eaten since 6 pm last night. It is currently nearly 1 pm and so I’ve gone 17 hours— which I’m fairly used to. Things will get tougher in a few hours, and so I have to keep drinking my water/tea regularly to prevent excessive hunger.

My writing has been adversely affected by my health problems in part because I do keep going off my ketogenic diet, and find it hard to get back on because going OFF saps my energy. Fasting, like going keto, tends to increase your energy.

I’m also hoping that the alternate-day fasting will give me extra time both for writing and for getting things done around the house, because I won’t have to be spending as much time cooking and washing dishes. I will post updates on this blog to let you know how it’s working out.

 

Getting fat people to plead guilty

It’s funny how easy it is to make a fat person plead guilty to a dietary crime. I sometimes watch this program where a weight-loss surgeon berates morbidly obese people. Somehow all his patients end up accusing themselves of ’emotional eating.’ Now, unless you count hunger as a emotion, or insist that no normal weight people take pleasure in tasty food, or that normal people don’t eat when they have reason to be down or depressed, this doesn’t make all that much sense.  But this particular doc seems to encourage a belief in ’emotional eating.’ But he’s willing to perform the surgeries anyway.

In older weight loss books the theory was that a fat person was the guy who reached for a extra slice of bread at the dinner table. To understand that, you must know that years ago, people placed a basket of bread at the table for each meal. If you ate your share of the prepared foods and were still hungry, you took a slice of bread. If you were still hungry, you took more bread. I am sure there were plenty of fat people back in that day who WEREN’T filling up on bread at every meal. But it seemed that everyone who bought a weight loss book back then was willing to plead guilty to taking that extra slice of bread. After all, most of them had taken bread at the dinner table at least once.

Fat people tend to have low self-esteem because they are told that their extra weight is caused by their own bad behavior. So they admit guilt to  whatever it is thin people or doctors accuse them of doing. But the science is not behind all these little pet theories. There is research that would indicate that the real problem that causes weight gain has to do with how an individual person metabolizes carbohydrates. If you have metabolic syndrome or insulin resistance, it’s likely you are overweight or will become overweight. If you remove the root of your problem by adopting a healthy low-carb diet as a lifelong eating plan, you will likely lose weight and feel better without the need of massive doses of ‘willpower’ to help you stick to the diet in spite of hunger— because after the first couple of days on a low-carb diet, you don’t really feel hungry.

I think it’s time that we who have weight problems stop pleading guilty to ’emotional eating’ or taking ‘extra’ bread and start realizing we have a physical, biological condition that is not our fault. Read some good books on low-carb/ketogenic diets— I’d recommend the original Atkins diet book, as well as ‘Keto Clarity’ by Jimmie Moore and ‘How I Gave Up My Low-Fat Diet and Lost 40 Pounds’ by Dana Carpender. Because berating ourselves doesn’t cure anything. Knowledge, however, when properly applied, does.